Consumers over 55 aren't happy with retail stores

Shoppers over the age of 55 are having a harder time finding items in retail stores, a recent report by Aldata shows, and the frustration from navigating shelves could lead to lower sentiments about customer satisfaction and loyalty.

Shoppers over the age of 55 are having a harder time finding items in retail stores, a recent report by Aldata shows, and the frustration from navigating shelves could lead to lower sentiments about customer satisfaction and loyalty.

"The over 50s value convenience over cost and by making store layout changes where they see no perceived benefit, retailers are in fact risking their long-term loyalty to the store," Mark Croxton, head of global customer support for Aldata told Talking Retail. 

The study included 1,000 consumers who reported that it can be frustrating when stores change layouts and move products around. One third of shoppers said they spent 20 percent longer in a store following a layout change.

Instead of perceiving the changes as a way for the company to improve the shoppers' convenience, loyal customers believe that their extra time spent in the store has become unnecessarily confusing and 62 percent believe the changes are a ploy to keep them in the store longer, according to the study.

The results indicate that retail stores are missing the mark for an engaging shopping experience, Croxton told the source, and as a result are pushing their loyal customers to a breaking point.